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研究生:王嘉蘭
研究生(外文):Wang Chia-Lan
論文名稱:大英帝國之不滿:《達洛威夫人》及《燈塔行》之時間,帝國,異性戀
論文名稱(外文):Reading the (Dis)Contents of the British Empire: Imperialism, Heterosexuality, and Time in Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway and To the Lighthouse
指導教授:李秀娟李秀娟引用關係
指導教授(外文):Hsiu-chuan Lee
學位類別:碩士
校院名稱:國立臺灣師範大學
系所名稱:英語研究所
學門:人文學門
學類:外國語文學類
論文種類:學術論文
論文出版年:2002
畢業學年度:90
語文別:英文
論文頁數:84
中文關鍵詞:吳爾芙達洛威夫人燈塔行帝國主義女性主義時間
外文關鍵詞:Virginia WoolfMrs. DallowayTo the LighthouseImperialismFeminismPerformative and Pedagogical time
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中文摘要
在《達洛威夫人》 及 《燈塔行》中,吳爾芙揭露帝國主義的不足與矛盾。在本文第一章,我討論吳爾芙如何將帝國主義貶為謀利手段以指出帝國主義的荒唐。帝國主義之所以自相矛盾,在於其以表面的理想掩蓋侵略者的野蠻暴力,最後並帶來殘酷的戰爭。更有甚者,重視「均衡」之道的帝國主義實質上卻加深了國內階級及性別的不平等。性別歧視,尤其在家庭場域中,構築了帝國權力傾軋的重要部分。在第二章我探討了吳爾芙對大英帝國異性戀傳統的批判。帝國主義所重視的父權婚姻建立了一套男女二元對立論,強加諸於個人身上性別角色,造成小說中各個角色的認同與慾望桎梏。吳爾芙小說中的角色感受到扮演傳統性別角色之困難重重。因不願受縛於性別規範,他/她們各自發展出多樣的愛情面貌。除了性別歧視之外,吳爾芙也試圖解構帝國時間,這是第三章所要探究的重點。簡單的說,吳爾芙不強調時間的一致性及直線性,反而呈現帝國主義直線時間的漏洞。在小說中吳爾芙揭露了人皆受困於當下時空的事實。即便帝國制度訂定了一套完美的國族歷史教條,小說人物所感受到的卻是破碎混淆,而非直線進行的當下時刻。

Abstract
In Mrs. Dalloway and To the Lighthouse, Woolf de-constructs imperialism by exposing its inadequacy and contradictions. As I attempt to discuss in my first chapter, Woolf points out the folly of the British Empire, which is reduced by her to a matter of monetary profits. The imperialist ideals are self-contradictory because underneath these ideals the empire carries out the most barbaric deeds of invading other countries by force and eventually brings about the gruesome wars. Moreover, with its emphasis on the idea of proportion, imperialism enhances the inequality inside a nation through class distinction and sexism. Particularly in domestic circumstances, sexism accounts for an important portion of the imperialist thinking. Therefore, in my second chapter, I would like to look into Woolf’s criticism of heterosexual traditions in the empire. The patriarchal marriage the British Empire values creates a set of binaries between man and woman. The imposed division of gender roles in the imperial order becomes a confinement for the characters in the novels. Woolf’s characters find it difficult to conform to the institutional gender codes. Feeling restrained by the gender codes, they refuse to comply with what is required of them as male or female and develop heterogeneous forms of love in the end. In addition to sexism, another element that Woolf attempts to de-construct is the imperial time order, which will be my focus of analysis in the third chapter. Instead of emphasizing the coherent linearity of time, Woolf reveals the gaps in the imperial linear temporality. In her novels she suggests that we are permanently caught in the present. Even though the imperial order lays out a perfect pedagogical history of the nation, the performative present the characters live in is rather perceived as fragmented, intermingled, and by no means linear.

Table of Contents
Introduction A Woman with No Country
Reading Woolf beyond Feminist Politics....1
Chapter One “They are plastered over with grimaces:”
Unmasking the British Empire in Mrs. Dalloway..8
Chapter Two “Love had a thousand shapes:”
Sexual Relationships in To the Lighthouse.....29
Chapter Three De-Lineating the Imperial Order:
Time in Mrs. Dalloway and To the Lighthouse...51
Conclusion Casting a New Light:
Woolf’s Vision beyond the Imperial Order.....71
Works Cited................................................ 80

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